Quilt Block & Trail

octagonal star quilt block

UUFF Quilt Square - Octagonal Star
Installed April 18, 2011

We are Block #17 on the Macon County Quilt Trail.
http://www.maconcountyquilttrail.org/

Among the many summer visitors who came to enjoy our beautiful mountains in the early 1970’s were Myrtle and Art Lockwood. They were devoted Unitarian Universalists.  Not finding a UU Church in Franklin and missing their accustomed Sunday morning discussions, they placed an advertisement in the local paper.  The ad asked if there were other UUs who would be interested in getting together for philosophical and theological discussions.  Two couples responded, and thus began the nucleus of the Franklin UU Fellowship.  The group met in member homes until it became too large and a search was begun to find a larger meeting place.  A suitable property was found.  Two families -- the Shindelmans and the Whites -- made personal loans to facilitate the purchase.  The group pooled their energies and skills to convert a dwelling house into a sanctuary. 

In 1974 the UU Fellowship of Macon County, NC became a member congregation of the Unitarian Universalist Association.  The name was later modified, and in 2005 the UU Fellowship of Franklin, NC incorporated in their own right as a non-profit organization.  The Fellowship is a congregation of progressive minds and caring connections and has been lay-led throughout its history

With the meeting space once again too small to accommodate the growing membership, plans were begun to build a new sanctuary/social hall.  A capital campaign was launched and a long range planning committee was established.  Influenced by the seven UU Principles; the congregation voted to build, to the best of its ability and resources, a round building that adheres to the “Green Sanctuary” designation.  The new sanctuary was dedicated on January 4, 2009.  That same year the Fellowship completed the credentials to be recognized as “A Welcoming Congregation”.

Our quilt square is the “octagonal star", designed by Virginia Wilson.  We’ve chosen a circular shape to reflect our round sanctuary and spirit of equality.  The green outside points reflect our commitment to environmental stewardship while the rainbow center symbolizes our celebration of diversity. A close look at the center will reveal an optical experience, symbolic of our outreach program. The colors and planes reach out to welcome you and to invite you to visit/join our services, religious education (RE) programs, lectures and seasonal performances. 

Our Seven Principles

1. Respect for all people, 2. Fair and kind treatment to all, 3.Yearn to accept and learn about ourselves, others and mystery,  4. Grow by exploring what is true and right in life, 5. Believe in our ideas and act on them, 6. Insist on a peaceful, fair and free world, 7. Value our home, earth, that we share with all living things