Events Archive

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, January 10, 2016 - 6:00am
Who Is In Your Moral Universe?

Holley Ulbrich. If we listen to Ayn Rand or some of our more extreme libertarian friends, my moral universe is just me, myself and I.  If we listen to Peter Seeger or Jesus or Mother Theresa or Albert Schweitzer, it includes every living being.  How do we find a place between those extremes where we can decide what we are responsible for and to whom without exhausting our time, energy, and resources? We'll try to make a good start on how each of us responds to that challenge.

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, February 21, 2016 - 6:00am
The Sin of Idolatry: Superheroes,Messiahs, and Presidents

Holley Ulbrich. Our fifth source, humanism, counsels us against the idolatries of mind and spirit. One form of idolatry is counting on someone else to save us from ourselves, sparing us from the hard work of doing it ourselves. It's deeply embedded in American culture, and even UUs are not immune to the temptation.

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, March 27, 2016 - 7:00am
Practicing Resurrection

Holley Ulbrich. Resurrection is one of those words that is rejected by many Unitarian Universalists because so many of our friends and neighbors insist on affirming the resurrection of Jesus as literal truth. We are in the season of rebirth, and many of us are also grappling with the loss of loved ones in the recent past.  How can the parable of the resurrection help us to both celebrate rebirth and renewal and grapple with the reality of death?

Service Leader: Steve Bowling

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, May 15, 2016 - 7:00am
Where Do I Place My Trust?

Holley Ulbrich. Somewhere between being a "patsy" at one extreme and paranoia at the other lies the right level of trust in ourselves and in others, including social institutions. Polls tel us that we are a distrustful nation, arming ourselves to the teeth, buying lots of insurance and trusting neither the market nor the government to create and sustain a livable society. Developing and practicing informed trust can it possible to live rich and meaningful lives without swaddling ourselves in layers of protection against those who prey on trusting souls. How do we, as individuals and as a faith tradition, learn to strike that balance?

Service Leader: Mary Teslow

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, July 31, 2016 - 7:00am
A Harvest of Gratitude

Holley Ulbrich. Lammas or Lughnasad is the ancient Celtic festival of first harvest, an appropriate time to celebrate gratitude for the abundance of the earth and of our lives.  This service will include a “blessing of the vegetables,” following a custom that persisted in this country in churches in colonial times of bringing the first fruits of the harvest to share with others. 

Service Leader: Mary Teslow

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, September 4, 2016 - 7:20am
Work, Spiritual Practice, and Economic Justice: A Labor Day Reflection

Holley Ulbrich. Work, or vocation, or career takes up a lot of our time and energy.  With an attitude of mindfulness, work of any kind, from folding laundry to weeding the garden to cleaning teeth and cooking meals and teaching classes and building houses can be a spiritual practice.  It can also be a source of community (derived from the Latin communire, to build together) and a challenge to our sense of social justice.  How do we tie these threads of reflection on the work of our hands, heads and hearts into a meaningful understanding of the role of work in the life of people of faith?

Service Leader: Mary Teslow

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, November 6, 2016 - 6:00am
Unitarians as Presidents (or Nearly)

Holley Ulbrich. How many Unitarians (no Universalists) have been president and/or vice president of the US?  Six for sure, with two more contested.  (One came to the faith after his presidency, and the other was raised that way but had to at least appear to be more conventionally Christian.) Why were so many of them one-termers?  A reflection on their strengths and weaknesses in public service as related to their/our faith tradition may offer some insights on how Unitarian Universalism can function as a bridge between factions and a mediator in a polarized nation.

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, January 8, 2017 - 6:00am
99 Sheep

Holley Ulbrich. POSTPONED When the shepherd goes off to rescue the lost sheep, what happens to the other 99? Who protects them from wolves or finds them a new place to graze?  How does it look different from the perspective of the shepherd, the lost sheep, and the other 99? We start the new year with some hard questions where religion, economics, and ethics challenge us not just to do the right thing but to figure out what is the right thing to do.

Service Leader: Mary Teslow

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, February 26, 2017 - 6:00am
99 Sheep

Holley Ulbrich.  When the shepherd goes off to rescue the lost sheep, what happens to the other 99? Who protects them from wolves or finds them a new place to graze?  How does it look different from the perspective of the shepherd, the lost sheep, and the other 99? We start the new year with some hard questions where religion, economics, and ethics challenge us not just to do the right thing but to figure out what is the right thing to do.

Service Leader: Mary Teslow

Holley   Ulbrich
Sunday, May 28, 2017 - 7:00am
The Ties that Bind: Living in Covenanted Community

Holley Ulbrich. The word covenant has long been bandied about in UU circles, but it's gaining more traction lately. Congregations, boards, committees, and other groups are setting some boundaries about how we behave and how we relate.  We have a long history of individualism in Unitarian Universalism that can make it difficult to work together to create and sustain healthy congregational communities.  When there is conflict, how do we restrain the urge to pick up our marbles and go home?  How do we balance respect for the individual with shared responsibility to and for each other and for the whole?

 

Service Leader: Joan Hawthorne